3. Synthesis of Chiral Amines Using Transaminases

  1. Peter J. Dunn3,
  2. K. K. (Mimi) Hii4,
  3. Michael J. Krische5 and
  4. Michael T. Williams6
  1. Nicholas J. Turner1 and
  2. Matthew D. Truppo2

Published Online: 23 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118354520.ch03

Sustainable Catalysis: Challenges and Practices for the Pharmaceutical and Fine Chemical Industries

Sustainable Catalysis: Challenges and Practices for the Pharmaceutical and Fine Chemical Industries

How to Cite

Turner, N. J. and Truppo, M. D. (2013) Synthesis of Chiral Amines Using Transaminases, in Sustainable Catalysis: Challenges and Practices for the Pharmaceutical and Fine Chemical Industries (eds P. J. Dunn, K. K. (. Hii, M. J. Krische and M. T. Williams), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey. doi: 10.1002/9781118354520.ch03

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Pfizer Green Chemistry Lead, Sandwich, Kent, United Kingdom

  2. 4

    Imperial College London, South Kensington, London, United Kingdom

  3. 5

    University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America

  4. 6

    CMC Consultant, Deal, Kent, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. 1

    Manchester Institute for Biotechnology, School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK

  2. 2

    Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 MAY 2013
  2. Published Print: 8 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118155424

Online ISBN: 9781118354520

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Keywords:

  • biocatalyst;
  • chemocatalysis;
  • chiral amines;
  • ketones;
  • transaminases

Summary

This chapter reviews the use of transaminases, an emerging class of biocatalyst that are finding increased application in the direct conversion of ketones to (chiral) amines. Directed evolution has proven a powerful strategy for broadening the substrate specificity of transaminases, such that they are now able to catalyze amination of a structurally broad range of ketones. Ongoing developments, particularly with respect to engineering transaminases that are suitably robust to be used with high-substrate concentration, and in the presence of organic solvents, suggest that these enzymes may soon become the method of choice for converting ketones to chiral primary amines