15. Catalytic Variants of Phosphine Oxide-Mediated Organic Transformations

  1. Peter J. Dunn2,
  2. K. K. (Mimi) Hii3,
  3. Michael J. Krische4 and
  4. Michael T. Williams5
  1. Stephen P. Marsden

Published Online: 23 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118354520.ch15

Sustainable Catalysis: Challenges and Practices for the Pharmaceutical and Fine Chemical Industries

Sustainable Catalysis: Challenges and Practices for the Pharmaceutical and Fine Chemical Industries

How to Cite

Marsden, S. P. (2013) Catalytic Variants of Phosphine Oxide-Mediated Organic Transformations, in Sustainable Catalysis: Challenges and Practices for the Pharmaceutical and Fine Chemical Industries (eds P. J. Dunn, K. K. (. Hii, M. J. Krische and M. T. Williams), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey. doi: 10.1002/9781118354520.ch15

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Pfizer Green Chemistry Lead, Sandwich, Kent, United Kingdom

  2. 3

    Imperial College London, South Kensington, London, United Kingdom

  3. 4

    University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America

  4. 5

    CMC Consultant, Deal, Kent, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 MAY 2013
  2. Published Print: 8 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118155424

Online ISBN: 9781118354520

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Keywords:

  • Appel halogenations;
  • aza-wittig chemistry;
  • catalytic variants;
  • Mitsunobu chemistry;
  • phosphorus-mediated transformations

Summary

This chapter discusses progress and impediments in the development of catalytic organophosphorus processes for olefination, imination, halogenation, and nucleophilic substitution (Mitsunobu) reactions. In each case, a perspective on current industrial applications and issues is given. The chapter discusses the various separation/recycling approaches that have been adopted so that readers can assess the state of the art in the catalytic processes alongside the alternative protocols. Despite widespread applications in academic and industrial discovery laboratories, there are no examples of the scale-up of the aza-Wittig reaction. Organophosphorus-mediated halogenations are widely used on a laboratory scale, with so-called Appel halogenations using triphenylphosphonium dihalides being especially popular.