30. Single Organ Vasculitis

  1. Gary S. Hoffman MD, MS3,
  2. Cornelia M. Weyand MD, PhD4,
  3. Carol A. Langford MD, MHS3 and
  4. Jörg J. Goronzy MD, PhD4
  1. José Hernández-Rodríguez MD1,2 and
  2. Gary S. Hoffman MD, MS3

Published Online: 3 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118355244.ch30

Inflammatory Diseases of Blood Vessels, Second Edition

Inflammatory Diseases of Blood Vessels, Second Edition

How to Cite

Hernández-Rodríguez, J. and Hoffman, G. S. (2012) Single Organ Vasculitis, in Inflammatory Diseases of Blood Vessels, Second Edition (eds G. S. Hoffman, C. M. Weyand, C. A. Langford and J. J. Goronzy), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118355244.ch30

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Diseases, Center for Vasculitis Care and Research, Cleveland Clinic, Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA

  2. 4

    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Vasculitis Research Unit, Department of Autoimmune and Systemic Diseases, Hospital Clínic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

  2. 2

    Insititut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain

  3. 3

    Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Diseases, Center for Vasculitis Care and Research, Cleveland Clinic, Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 MAY 2012
  2. Published Print: 8 JUN 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444338225

Online ISBN: 9781118355244

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Single organ vasculitis;
  • isolated vasculitis;
  • nerve vasculitis;
  • breast vasculitis;
  • gynecologic vasculitis;
  • testicular vasculitis;
  • gastrointestinal vasculitis;
  • isolated aortitis

Summary

Vascular inflammation may affect single organs or systems without systemic involvement. The territories that may be affected in single organ vasculitis (SOV) may also be targeted in systemic vasculitis. Therefore, it is essential that the diagnosis of SOV is not applied until it is clear that inflammatory vascular disease is not present in other sites.

SOV may affect organs in a multifocal fashion (e.g. central nervous system, skin), usually requiring systemic therapy, or may be limited to single (focal) sites (e.g. breasts, gynecologic, urologic and gastrointestinal structures). Focal SOV is often an incidental finding, found in the course of biopsies for suspected malignancy. Most often SOV occurs in the absence of constitutional or musculoskeletal symptoms and acute phase reactants are usually normal. The prognosis of SOV is usually very good and resection of the tissue affected by vasculitis is often sufficient to achieve cures.