32. Buerger's Disease (Thromboangiitis Obliterans)

  1. Gary S. Hoffman MD, MS3,
  2. Cornelia M. Weyand MD, PhD4,
  3. Carol A. Langford MD, MHS3 and
  4. Jörg J. Goronzy MD, PhD4
  1. Ahmet Ruchan Akar MD, FRCS (CTh)1 and
  2. Serkan Durdu MD, PhD2

Published Online: 3 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118355244.ch32

Inflammatory Diseases of Blood Vessels, Second Edition

Inflammatory Diseases of Blood Vessels, Second Edition

How to Cite

Akar, A. R. and Durdu, S. (2012) Buerger's Disease (Thromboangiitis Obliterans), in Inflammatory Diseases of Blood Vessels, Second Edition (eds G. S. Hoffman, C. M. Weyand, C. A. Langford and J. J. Goronzy), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118355244.ch32

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Diseases, Center for Vasculitis Care and Research, Cleveland Clinic, Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA

  2. 4

    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Ankara University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey

  2. 2

    Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Ankara University School of Medicine, Ankara University Stem Cell Institute, Ankara, Turkey

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 MAY 2012
  2. Published Print: 8 JUN 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444338225

Online ISBN: 9781118355244

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Buerger's disease;
  • thromboangiitis obliterans;
  • vascular inflammation;
  • vasculitis

Summary

Buerger's disease, also called thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), is a chronic, inflammatory, thrombotic, nonatherosclerotic, segmental, obliterative, tobacco-associated vasculopathy primarily involving medium and small-sized arteries. The disease frequently involves adjacent or superficial veins and nerves. TAO often presents with distal extremity ischemia in a male heavy-smoker before age of 45 years. Pathologically, TAO is characterized by a highly cellular arterial thrombus with relative sparing of the blood vessel wall, and preserved internal elastic lamina in all stages of the disease. Absence of elevated acute-phase reactants and immunologic markers is unique for TAO in comparison to other types vasculitis. Patients experience periods of acute exacerbation associated with smoking, leading to tissue loss and major amputations. Remissions follow abstinence from tobacco or occur in the fifth to sixth decades of life.