42. Vasculitis as a Paraneoplastic Syndrome and Direct Tumor Invasion of Vessels

  1. Gary S. Hoffman MD, MS3,
  2. Cornelia M. Weyand MD, PhD4,
  3. Carol A. Langford MD, MHS3 and
  4. Jörg J. Goronzy MD, PhD4
  1. Claire E. Barber MD1 and
  2. Simon Carette MD, MPhil, FRCPC2

Published Online: 3 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118355244.ch42

Inflammatory Diseases of Blood Vessels, Second Edition

Inflammatory Diseases of Blood Vessels, Second Edition

How to Cite

Barber, C. E. and Carette, S. (2012) Vasculitis as a Paraneoplastic Syndrome and Direct Tumor Invasion of Vessels, in Inflammatory Diseases of Blood Vessels, Second Edition (eds G. S. Hoffman, C. M. Weyand, C. A. Langford and J. J. Goronzy), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118355244.ch42

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Diseases, Center for Vasculitis Care and Research, Cleveland Clinic, Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA

  2. 4

    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

  2. 2

    Division of Rheumatology, Toronto Western Hospital and Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 MAY 2012
  2. Published Print: 8 JUN 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444338225

Online ISBN: 9781118355244

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Keywords:

  • Malignancy;
  • neoplasia;
  • paraneoplastic;
  • vasculitis;
  • leukemic vasculitis;
  • leukocytoclastic vasculitis

Summary

Vasculitis has been associated with both hematologic and solid organ malignancies. In defining a true paraneoplastic event a temporal relationship should be firmly established and other causes of vasculitis such as drug reaction and infection should be excluded. Cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis is the most common type of paraneoplastic vasculitis but medium and large vessel vasculitides have also been described. Neoplastic invasion of blood vessels (leukemic vasculitis) can be differentiated from paraneoplastic vasculitis on the basis of tissue biopsy. The clinical features of vasculitis in the setting of an underlying malignancy are generally similar to those seen in patients without neoplastic disease; however, treatment response of the vasculitis may be suboptimal if the neoplasm is not also adequately treated. The pathogenesis of paraneoplastic vasculitis remains poorly understood.