6. Long-Distance Pollen Flow in Large Fragmented Landscapes

  1. Yves Bertheau
  1. Y. Brunet1,
  2. S. Dupont1,
  3. S. Delage1,
  4. D. Garrigou1,
  5. D. Guyon1,
  6. S. Dayau1,
  7. P. Tulet2,
  8. J.-P. Pinty3,
  9. C. Lac2,
  10. J. Escobar3,
  11. A. Audran4 and
  12. X. Foueillassar4

Published Online: 2 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118373781.ch6

Genetically Modified and Non-Genetically Modified Food Supply Chains: Co-Existence and Traceability

Genetically Modified and Non-Genetically Modified Food Supply Chains: Co-Existence and Traceability

How to Cite

Brunet, Y., Dupont, S., Delage, S., Garrigou, D., Guyon, D., Dayau, S., Tulet, P., Pinty, J.-P., Lac, C., Escobar, J., Audran, A. and Foueillassar, X. (2012) Long-Distance Pollen Flow in Large Fragmented Landscapes, in Genetically Modified and Non-Genetically Modified Food Supply Chains: Co-Existence and Traceability (ed Y. Bertheau), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118373781.ch6

Editor Information

  1. Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Versailles, France

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Villenave d'Ornon, France

  2. 2

    CNRM, Météo-France, Toulouse, France

  3. 3

    Laboratoire d'Aérologie, Toulouse, France

  4. 4

    Arvalis – Institut du végétal, Montardon, France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 2 OCT 2012
  2. Published Print: 2 NOV 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444337785

Online ISBN: 9781118373781

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Keywords:

  • atmospheric turbulence;
  • cross-pollination;
  • genetically modified crop;
  • long-distance dispersal;
  • maize;
  • Meso-NH;
  • pollen;
  • regional pollen transport;
  • simulation model;
  • wind

Summary

Recent evidence has shown that maize pollen can travel and remain viable at regional scales, which opens the possibility for long-distance cross-pollination. Here, we first report results obtained on small plots of white-kernel maize used as pollen traps, in a region with extensive maize cultivation, demonstrating that cross-pollination can indeed occur at several kilometres from the nearest source field. We also used the atmospheric Meso-NH model to better understand long-range dispersal of maize pollen. Simulations were performed over Southwest France during the maize pollination period. When compared with airborne measurements, the model provides good estimates of pollen concentration throughout the atmospheric boundary layer. It allows the pollen plume to be characterized during the day and permits the production of deposition maps of accumulated viable pollen. These results quantify long-distance pollen deposition; they show that background levels of cross-pollination are unavoidable at the regional scale and support the use of low purity thresholds by supply chain operators.