6. Services for People with Moderate Dementia

  1. Hugo de Waal MD, FRCPsych, FHEA4,
  2. Constantine Lyketsos MD, MHS5,
  3. David Ames BA, MD, FRCPsych, FRANZCP6 and
  4. John O'Brien BA, BM BCh, MA, FRCPsych, MD7
  1. Laura M. Struble1,
  2. Janet Kavanagh2 and
  3. Mary Blazek3

Published Online: 7 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118378663.ch6

Designing and Delivering Dementia Services

Designing and Delivering Dementia Services

How to Cite

Struble, L. M., Kavanagh, J. and Blazek, M. (2013) Services for People with Moderate Dementia, in Designing and Delivering Dementia Services (eds H. de Waal, C. Lyketsos, D. Ames and J. O'Brien), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118378663.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Lead Consultant, Norfolk Dementia Care Academy, Norwich, UK

  2. 5

    Associate Postgraduate Dean, East of England Deanery, Cambridge, UK

  3. 6

    Elizabeth Plank Althouse Professor, Director of the Johns Hopkins Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Maryland, USA

  4. 7

    Director, National Ageing Research Institute, University of Melbourne Professor of Ageing and Health, Victoria, Australia

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Michigan School of Nursing and the Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School, USA

  2. 2

    Project Development and Administration, Program for Positive Aging, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School, USA

  3. 3

    Department of Psychiatry, Geriatric Psychiatry Section, University of Michigan Medical School, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119953494

Online ISBN: 9781118378663

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Keywords:

  • moderate dementia;
  • middle stage dementia;
  • community-based care;
  • collaborative care management;
  • integrated services;
  • authentic partnership;
  • quality of life;
  • caregiver burden;
  • caregiver support

Summary

As people progress from the mild to the moderate stage of dementia they can no longer manage without assistance and require increased time and energy from their caregivers. Declining cognition, decreasing functional independence and increasing behavioural disturbances necessitate frequent assessment and reassessment of their condition. The progressive nature of the disease leads to changing needs for services and multiple transitions in care. The principal goals of services for people with moderate dementia include optimisation of physical health, cognition, activity, and wellbeing; detection and treatment of behavioural symptoms; provision of information and long-term support to caregivers and delay of premature institutionalisation. Current approaches to defining needs and provision of services include collaboration with the person with dementia, their caregivers and service providers in emphasising a continual care psychosocial model.