9. Developing Policy that Works for Dementia: National and Global Lessons in What Makes a Difference

  1. Hugo de Waal MD, FRCPsych, FHEA2,
  2. Constantine Lyketsos MD, MHS3,
  3. David Ames BA, MD, FRCPsych, FRANZCP4 and
  4. John O'Brien BA, BM BCh, MA, FRCPsych, MD5
  1. Sube Banerjee

Published Online: 7 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118378663.ch9

Designing and Delivering Dementia Services

Designing and Delivering Dementia Services

How to Cite

Banerjee, S. (2013) Developing Policy that Works for Dementia: National and Global Lessons in What Makes a Difference, in Designing and Delivering Dementia Services (eds H. de Waal, C. Lyketsos, D. Ames and J. O'Brien), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118378663.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Lead Consultant, Norfolk Dementia Care Academy, Norwich, UK

  2. 3

    Associate Postgraduate Dean, East of England Deanery, Cambridge, UK

  3. 4

    Elizabeth Plank Althouse Professor, Director of the Johns Hopkins Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Maryland, USA

  4. 5

    Director, National Ageing Research Institute, University of Melbourne Professor of Ageing and Health, Victoria, Australia

Author Information

  1. Centre for Dementia Studies, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119953494

Online ISBN: 9781118378663

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • dementia policies;
  • UK National Dementia Strategy;
  • governmental initiatives;
  • national dementia plans;
  • implementing dementia strategies

Summary

This chapter pulls together the themes from the excellent complementary commentaries on policy development presented in chapter 8, for England (Alzheimer's Society UK, ASUK), Australia (Alzheimer's Australia, AA), Europe (Alzheimer Europe, AE) and the world (Alzheimer's Disease International, ADI). I will identify some of the elements that make for the likelihood of initiatives being successful in generating good policy for dementia. Good policy does not always equate with good services, but poor policy will almost never enable the growth of better services. So it is a worthy aim. In this I will draw themes from each of the four contributions and illustrate them with experiences derived from the development of the English National Dementia Strategy.