23. Hygiene and Other Early Childhood Influences on the Subsequent Function of the Immune System

  1. Tracey J. Lamb
  1. Graham A. W. Rook

Published Online: 10 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118393321.ch23

Immunity to Parasitic Infection

Immunity to Parasitic Infection

How to Cite

Rook, G. A. W. (2012) Hygiene and Other Early Childhood Influences on the Subsequent Function of the Immune System, in Immunity to Parasitic Infection (ed T. J. Lamb), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118393321.ch23

Editor Information

  1. Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, 2015 Uppergate Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA

Author Information

  1. Centre for Infectious Diseases and International Health, Windeyer Institute for Medical Sciences, University College London (UCL), London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 10 AUG 2012
  2. Published Print: 14 SEP 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470972472

Online ISBN: 9781118393321

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Keywords:

  • Hygiene Hypothesis (or ‘Old Friends’ hypothesis);
  • XLAAD, aspects of allergy, autoimmunity and enteropathy;
  • epidemiological transitions;
  • compensatory genetic variants;
  • critical organisms and their immunological role;
  • helminth infections and allergic disorders;
  • effects of anti-helminthics

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • The Hygiene Hypothesis (or ‘Old Friends’ hypothesis)

  • Epidemiological transitions

  • Compensatory genetic variants

  • The critical organisms and their immunological role

  • Helminth infections and allergic disorders

  • Helminths and non-allergic chronic inflammatory disorders: human data

  • Animal models of helminth infection used to test the Hygiene Hypothesis

  • Non-helminthic ‘Old Friends’

  • Mechanisms of immunoregulation

  • Conclusions

  • References for further reading