2. Developmental Morphology and Life Cycles of the Microsporidia

  1. Louis M. Weiss3 and
  2. James J. Becnel4
  1. Ann Cali1 and
  2. Peter M. Takvorian2

Published Online: 1 AUG 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118395264.ch2

Microsporidia: Pathogens of Opportunity, First Edition

Microsporidia: Pathogens of Opportunity, First Edition

How to Cite

Cali, A. and Takvorian, P. M. (2014) Developmental Morphology and Life Cycles of the Microsporidia, in Microsporidia: Pathogens of Opportunity, First Edition (eds L. M. Weiss and J. J. Becnel), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118395264.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Pathology, Division of Parasitology and Tropical Medicine, and Department of Medicine Division of Infectious Diseases, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA

  2. 4

    USDA/ARS, Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, Gainesville, FL, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 AUG 2014
  2. Published Print: 9 SEP 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118395226

Online ISBN: 9781118395264

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Keywords:

  • appendages;
  • interfacial relationship;
  • life cycle;
  • microsporidia;
  • morphological features

Summary

This chapter reviews the morphological features and development of the more typical microsporidian life cycles. It refers the microsporidia as protists. The general life cycle pattern for the microsporidia can be divided into three phases: the infective or environmental phase; the proliferative phase, identified by some as merogony; and the sporogonic or spore-forming phase. The chapter deals with typical horizontally transmitted infections. Many microsporidia spend all or only the proliferative phase in one interfacial relationship with the host cell before another interfacial relationship forms in sporogony. An additional feature relating to the host–parasite interface and present in many of the aforementioned interfacial relationships is the presence of appendages. The sporogony phase includes sporonts, sporoblasts, and the spores.