22. Microsporidia, Honeybees, and Colony Collapse Disorder

  1. Louis M. Weiss2 and
  2. James J. Becnel3
  1. Ingemar Fries

Published Online: 1 AUG 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118395264.ch22

Microsporidia: Pathogens of Opportunity, First Edition

Microsporidia: Pathogens of Opportunity, First Edition

How to Cite

Fries, I. (2014) Microsporidia, Honeybees, and Colony Collapse Disorder, in Microsporidia: Pathogens of Opportunity, First Edition (eds L. M. Weiss and J. J. Becnel), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118395264.ch22

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Pathology, Division of Parasitology and Tropical Medicine, and Department of Medicine Division of Infectious Diseases, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA

  2. 3

    USDA/ARS, Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, Gainesville, FL, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 AUG 2014
  2. Published Print: 9 SEP 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118395226

Online ISBN: 9781118395264

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Keywords:

  • Asian honeybees;
  • colony collapse disorder (CCD);
  • European honeybees;
  • Microsporidia infections

Summary

From an evolutionary perspective, honeybees originate from predatory wasps that have abandoned predation to favor collection of nectar and pollen as food sources. The impact of microsporidian infections on colony fitness of Asian honeybees remains largely unknown. Nosema ceranae is currently the dominant microsporidia infection in honeybee colonies in many parts of the world, with few if any N. apis infections found. Honeybee colonies die for a number of reasons, often during winter, including starvation, ests, and pathogens. In Europe, there is only one recent observation of colony collapse disorder(CCD) symptoms reported, although European large-scale colony losses have been linked to N. ceranae infections. Microsporidian infections can be correlated to losses of honeybee colonies for both N. apis and N. ceranae. However, neither of the two parasites can be linked to CCD symptoms in the United States or in Europe.