10. Metabolic Syndrome as an Independent Risk Factor of Silent Brain Infarction

  1. Tahira Farooqui and
  2. Akhlaq A. Farooqui
  1. Jae-Sung Lim and
  2. Hyung-Min Kwon

Published Online: 11 OCT 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118395318.ch10

Metabolic Syndrome and Neurological Disorders

Metabolic Syndrome and Neurological Disorders

How to Cite

Lim, J.-S. and Kwon, H.-M. (2013) Metabolic Syndrome as an Independent Risk Factor of Silent Brain Infarction, in Metabolic Syndrome and Neurological Disorders (eds T. Farooqui and A. A. Farooqui), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118395318.ch10

Author Information

  1. Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 11 OCT 2013
  2. Published Print: 15 NOV 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118395271

Online ISBN: 9781118395318

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Keywords:

  • metabolic syndrome (MetS);
  • risk factor;
  • silent brain infarction (SBI)

Summary

Currently, the evidence that supports the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and silent brain infarction (SBI) is scarce. Based on the currently available evidence, MetS increased the risk of SBI both in normal healthy adults and the elderly. Full syndrome itself and each constituent such as elevated blood pressure, impaired fasting glucose, high triglyceride level, abnormal high-density lipoprotein, and increased abdominal circumference all showed correlations with SBI. Furthermore, the number of silent lesions increased when the subjects had more components of syndrome. Increased inflammatory activity, action of free radicals, vascular endothelial damage, reduction of insulin transport, and altered neurotrophic factors might be considered as possible pathophysiologic links between MetS and SBI. This chapter outlines the basic concepts of SBI for its epidemiology, characteristics, and health impacts. In addition, the authors have summarized the current evidences for SBI in subjects with MetS.