6. Modulation of Cognition by Insulin and Aging: Implications for Alzheimer Disease

  1. Tahira Farooqui and
  2. Akhlaq A. Farooqui
  1. Maite Solas and
  2. Maria J. Ramírez

Published Online: 11 OCT 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118395318.ch6

Metabolic Syndrome and Neurological Disorders

Metabolic Syndrome and Neurological Disorders

How to Cite

Solas, M. and Ramírez, M. J. (2013) Modulation of Cognition by Insulin and Aging: Implications for Alzheimer Disease, in Metabolic Syndrome and Neurological Disorders (eds T. Farooqui and A. A. Farooqui), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118395318.ch6

Author Information

  1. Department of Pharmacology and Division of Neurosciences, CIMA, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 11 OCT 2013
  2. Published Print: 15 NOV 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118395271

Online ISBN: 9781118395318

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Keywords:

  • aging;
  • Alzheimer disease (AD);
  • brain insulin resistance;
  • cognition;
  • insulin receptor signaling;
  • protein anormalities

Summary

The role of insulin in the brain has gradually expanded, from initial conceptions of the brain as insulin-insensitive through identification of a role in regulation of feeding, to recent demonstration of insulin as a key component of hippocampal memory processes. Conversely, systemic insulin resistance such as that seen in type 2 diabetes is associated with a range of cognitive and neural deficits in clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies. Apparent paradoxical results have also been described, because lowered insulin activity has the potential to either compromise the integrity of the central nervous system (CNS) or extend lifespan. Thus, a greater understanding of actions of insulin could help develop new therapeutic approaches to normal and pathological brain aging. Dysfunction of insulin signaling might be involved in the pathological events that lead to the development of neurofibrillary lesions and amyloid plaques that are characteristic of Alzheimer disease (AD) brains.