9. Of Sound Mind and Body: Dietary Lifestyles, Promotion of Healthy Brain Aging, and Prevention of Dementia in Healthy Individuals

  1. Tahira Farooqui and
  2. Akhlaq A. Farooqui
  1. Giulio Maria Pasinetti1,2,
  2. Amanda Bilski1,
  3. Lap Ho1,2,
  4. Jun Wang1,2,
  5. Mario Ferruzzi3,
  6. Masahito Yamada4,
  7. Kenjiro Ono4 and
  8. Salvatore Mannino5

Published Online: 11 OCT 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118395318.ch9

Metabolic Syndrome and Neurological Disorders

Metabolic Syndrome and Neurological Disorders

How to Cite

Maria Pasinetti, G., Bilski, A., Ho, L., Wang, J., Ferruzzi, M., Yamada, M., Ono, K. and Mannino, S. (2013) Of Sound Mind and Body: Dietary Lifestyles, Promotion of Healthy Brain Aging, and Prevention of Dementia in Healthy Individuals, in Metabolic Syndrome and Neurological Disorders (eds T. Farooqui and A. A. Farooqui), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118395318.ch9

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

  2. 2

    GRECC, James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Nutrition Science and Food Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Neurology and Neurobiology and Aging, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, Japan

  5. 5

    Geriatric Output Unit, Ospedale Alzano, Bergamo, Italy

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 11 OCT 2013
  2. Published Print: 15 NOV 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118395271

Online ISBN: 9781118395318

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Keywords:

  • Alzheimer disease (AD);
  • dementia;
  • diabetes;
  • healthy brain aging;
  • lifestyle factors;
  • polyphenols

Summary

There is mounting evidence suggesting that cognitive impairment associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) can be traced back to neuropathological conditions initiated several decades before disease onset. Among lifestyle factors receiving a large amount of attention for being potentially associated with an increased risk for age-related cognitive deterioration, and possibly dementia, are features of metabolic syndrome. There is also accumulating evidence that some of the pathophysiological effects associated with metabolic syndrome are beneficially modulated by bioactive dietary polyphenols through multiple mechanisms including indirect mechanisms, such as by modulating peripheral metabolic syndrome pathophysiological phenotypes, and direct mechanisms, such as by modulating activities of the brain. Therefore, targeting the effects of metabolic syndrome on the brain, specifically attempting to modulate multiple non-redundant epigenetic molecular mechanisms among other mechanisms, with novel combinations of highly tolerable polyphenolic compounds, may be significant for developing novel therapeutic strategies in AD.