15. Carbonate Production in Rift Basins: Models for Platform Inception, Growth and Dismantling, and for Shelf to Basin Sediment Transport, Miocene Sardinia Rift Basin, Italy

  1. Maria Mutti3,
  2. Werner Piller4 and
  3. Christian Betzler5
  1. Mario Vigorito1,
  2. Marco Murru2 and
  3. Lucia Simone1

Published Online: 3 APR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118398364.ch15

Carbonate Systems during the Oligocene-Miocene Climatic Transition

Carbonate Systems during the Oligocene-Miocene Climatic Transition

How to Cite

Vigorito, M., Murru, M. and Simone, L. (2012) Carbonate Production in Rift Basins: Models for Platform Inception, Growth and Dismantling, and for Shelf to Basin Sediment Transport, Miocene Sardinia Rift Basin, Italy, in Carbonate Systems during the Oligocene-Miocene Climatic Transition (eds M. Mutti, W. Piller and C. Betzler), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118398364.ch15

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Institut für Erd- und Umweltwissenschaften Universität Potsdam, Postfach 60 15 53 D-14415 Potsdam, Germany

  2. 4

    Institute for Earth Sciences (Geology & Paleontology) University of Graz, Heinrichstrasse 26, A-8010 Graz, Austria

  3. 5

    Geologisch-Palaeontologisches Institut, Bundesstr. 55, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany

Author Information

  1. 1

    Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Largo San Marcellino 10, 80138 Napoli, Italy

  2. 2

    Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università di Cagliari, via Trentino 51, 09127 Cagliari, Italy

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 APR 2012
  2. Published Print: 5 APR 2012

Book Series:

  1. Special Publication Number 42 of the International Association of Sedimentologists

Book Series Editors:

  1. Ian Jarvis6,7

Series Editor Information

  1. 6

    School of Geography, Geology and the Environment Centre for Earth and Environmental Science Research, Kingston University London, UK

  2. 7

    Penrhyn Road, Kingston upon Thames KT1 2EE, UK

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444337914

Online ISBN: 9781118398364

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Keywords:

  • Carbonate sequences;
  • rift basin;
  • fault blocks;
  • depositional architectures;
  • Miocene;
  • Sardinia

Summary

The main sedimentary and architectural patterns of Miocene carbonate successions laid down in the Miocene Sardinia Rift Basin are described, and the controls on sedimentation, facies distribution and sequence development are evaluated. Three case-histories from different physiographic settings are described which correspond to: (1) narrow riftrelated submerged valleys; (2) isolated fault-blocks in the axial portion of the rift; and (3) small basins located at the edge of the rift itself. Facies distribution and depositional architectures appear to have been controlled mainly by palaeophysiography and in turn by pre- and synsedimentary tectonics. These also played a leading role in dictating the type and evolution of the benthic communities and thus the location and morphology of the carbonate factories. Both coral-dominated and foramol-rhodalgal assemblages are recognized. These developed peculiar depositional architectures and had remarkably different responses to relative sea-level variations. Depending primarily on the palaeophysiography, the resulting carbonate successions occur as isolated carbonate lenses or as sedimentary bodies up to a few hundred metres thick.

In sectors close to the rift axis, coral-dominated factories developed on the side of isolated fault-blocks that faced the open sea. The geometry of the coral-dominated sequences suggests biostromal sedimentary accumulations rather then true reefs. These coral-dominated deposits interfinger with foramol-dominated sequences that were laid down in deeper sectors of the carbonate factories. Following a major regressive event, probably associated with climatic change, the coral-dominated factories were shut down and replaced by red algae and bivalve-dominated factories. Close to the margins of the rift-systems carbonate factory development was mainly controlled by the type and the rate of siliciclastic sedimentation. In submerged rift-related valleys with high siliciclastic input, small lenticular carbonate factories, locally forming small patchreefs, developed during phases of stasis between fresh floods. In other areas, relatively thick carbonate sequences accumulated at the top of prograding siliciclastic wedges and on hinterland-facing fault-blocks.