22a. Natural Products

  1. Adam P. Fraise MB, BS, FRCPath2,
  2. Jean-Yves Maillard Bsc, PhD, DSc3 and
  3. Syed A. Sattar PhD4
  1. Rose Cooper

Published Online: 17 DEC 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118425831.ch22a

Russell, Hugo & Ayliffe's: Principles and Practice of Disinfection, Preservation and Sterilization, 5th Edition

Russell, Hugo & Ayliffe's: Principles and Practice of Disinfection, Preservation and Sterilization, 5th Edition

How to Cite

Cooper, R. (2013) Natural Products, in Russell, Hugo & Ayliffe's: Principles and Practice of Disinfection, Preservation and Sterilization, 5th Edition (eds A. P. Fraise, J.-Y. Maillard and S. A. Sattar), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118425831.ch22a

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Microbiology Department, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre, Pathology – University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom

  2. 3

    Cardiff School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK

  3. 4

    Centre for Research on Environmental Microbiology (CREM), Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Author Information

  1. Department of Applied Sciences, Cardiff School of Health Sciences, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, Wales, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 17 DEC 2012
  2. Published Print: 10 JAN 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333251

Online ISBN: 9781118425831

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Keywords:

  • Antimicrobial peptides;
  • bacteriocins;
  • bee venom;
  • enzymes;
  • essential oils;
  • garlic;
  • green tea;
  • honey;
  • lactoferrin;
  • lantibiotics;
  • maggots;
  • propolis;
  • royal jelly;
  • tea tree oil

Summary

Historically, remedies for infectious diseases were largely derived from natural products. The development of antiseptics provided a means to reduce infections, but it was the availability of antibiotics that caused most traditional remedies to be forsaken. The subsequent emergence of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms and the prevalence of strains with multiple drug-resistant profiles made antibiotics less reliable than when they were introduced into clinical practice. The realization that microbial species within biofilms display significantly reduced susceptibility to antimicrobial agents and the establishment of an association between persistent infections and the presence of biofilms has reinforced the need to find new antimicrobial agents. Few antibiotics have been discovered in the past 30 years and so the need to search for alternative antimicrobial interventions has prompted re-evaluations of traditional treatments. This chapter explains how selected examples of natural products are demonstrating potential for treating and preventing infections.