12. Monomorphic Ventricular Tachycardia

  1. David H. Bennett MD FRCP

Published Online: 1 NOV 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118432389.ch12

Bennett's Cardiac Arrhythmias: Practical Notes on Interpretation and Treatment, Eighth Edition

Bennett's Cardiac Arrhythmias: Practical Notes on Interpretation and Treatment, Eighth Edition

How to Cite

Bennett, D. H. (2013) Monomorphic Ventricular Tachycardia, in Bennett's Cardiac Arrhythmias: Practical Notes on Interpretation and Treatment, Eighth Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118432389.ch12

Author Information

  1. Senior Consultant Cardiologist, University Hospital of South Manchester, Manchester, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 NOV 2012
  2. Published Print: 14 JAN 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470674932

Online ISBN: 9781118432389

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Keywords:

  • Accelerated idioventricular rhythm;
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy;
  • Coronary heart disease;
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy;
  • ECG characteristics;
  • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy;
  • Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia;
  • Non-sustained ventricular tachycardia;
  • Treatment

Summary

Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia consists of a rapid, regular succession of ventricular extrasystoles each with the same configuration. QRS duration exceeds 0.12 s and is usually greater than 0.14 s. P waves dissociated from ventricular activity, or fusion or capture beats, indicate independent atrial activity and confirm ventricular tachycardia. Common causes are myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy: dilated, hypertrophic or arrhythmogenic right ventricular.

Ventricular tachycardia is often a recurrent problem and may lead to sudden death. An implantable defibrillator may be indicated, particularly in patients with poor ventricular function.

Right ventricular outflow tract and fascicular tachycardias arise in structurally normal hearts, have a good prognosis and are ideally amenable to radiofrequency ablation. Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is ventricular tachycardia at a rate less than 120 beats/min: treatment is not required.

Wherever possible, obtain and save a 12-lead ECG during tachycardia for diagnostic purposes.