31. Wnt Signaling in Dementia

  1. Stefan Hoppler4 and
  2. Randall T. Moon5
  1. Haggarty Stephen J.1,2,3

Published Online: 7 MAR 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118444122.ch31

Wnt Signaling in Development and Disease: Molecular Mechanisms and Biological Functions

Wnt Signaling in Development and Disease: Molecular Mechanisms and Biological Functions

How to Cite

Stephen J., H. (2014) Wnt Signaling in Dementia, in Wnt Signaling in Development and Disease: Molecular Mechanisms and Biological Functions (eds S. Hoppler and R. T. Moon), John Wiley & Sons, Inc, Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118444122.ch31

Editor Information

  1. 4

    University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland

  2. 5

    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Neurology, Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Psychiatry, Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA,

  3. 3

    MGH Psychiatry Center for Experimental Drugs & Diagnostics, Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 MAR 2014
  2. Published Print: 5 MAY 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118444160

Online ISBN: 9781118444122

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Keywords:

  • Alzheimer's disease (AD);
  • dementia;
  • frontotemporal dementia (FTD);
  • Lewy bodies;
  • Wnt signaling

Summary

Numerous lines of evidence in the past decade point to a key role for dysregulation of Wnt signaling in the pathogenesis of dementia and response to potential therapeutic agents. This chapter reviews seminal findings that collectively demonstrate that important aspects of both the core age-related pathologies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) originally described by Lois Alzheimer over a century ago, namely, extracellular amyloid plaques composed of peptides derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles composed of phosphorylated Tau proteins, have intimate connections to aberrant Wnt signaling. While there are many different types and causes of dementia, outside of vascular dementia caused by stroke, the most common forms include AD, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and dementia with Lewy bodies, all of which have connections to Wnt signaling.