15. The Effects of High-Fat Diet on the Mouse Hypothalamus: A Stereological Study

  1. Peter R. Mouton PhD
  1. Mohammad Reza Namavar1,
  2. Samira Raminfard2,
  3. Zahra Vojdani Jahromi2 and
  4. Hassan Azari2

Published Online: 22 NOV 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118444177.ch15

Neurostereology: Unbiased Stereology of Neural Systems

Neurostereology: Unbiased Stereology of Neural Systems

How to Cite

Namavar, M. R., Raminfard, S., Jahromi, Z. V. and Azari, H. (2014) The Effects of High-Fat Diet on the Mouse Hypothalamus: A Stereological Study, in Neurostereology: Unbiased Stereology of Neural Systems (ed P. R. Mouton), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Ames, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118444177.ch15

Author Information

  1. 1

    Histomorphometry and Stereology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

  2. 2

    Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 22 NOV 2013
  2. Published Print: 17 JAN 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118444214

Online ISBN: 9781118444177

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • body mass index (BMI);
  • high-fat diet (HFD);
  • mice;
  • mouse hypothalamus;
  • neuronal density;
  • stereological analyses

Summary

This chapter presents a study that assesses the differential effects of either short-term or long-term exposure of mice to standard diet or high-fat diet (HFD). Male Balb-C mice were obtained from the Laboratory Animal House of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) at 6 weeks of age and housed in groups of two or three to acclimatize for 2 weeks prior to study under 12-h light/dark cycle with food and water ad libitum. The Ethical Committee of SUMS approved the procedures in the study. Mice were maintained on HFD or control diets for either 4 or 8 weeks. The results revealed significant increases in weight and body mass index (BMI) for both short-term and long-term treatment with HFD in comparison with their respective control groups. The study illustrates the pitfall, the so-called reference trap, which may arise when relying on changes in neuronal density, rather than total neuron number.