15. Nanostructured Silicon-Based Materials as a Drug Delivery System for Water-Insoluble Drugs

  1. Dennis Douroumis1 and
  2. Alfred Fahr2
  1. Vesa-Pekka Lehto,
  2. Jarno Salonen,
  3. Helder Santos and
  4. Joakim Riikonen

Published Online: 4 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118444726.ch15

Drug Delivery Strategies for Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs

Drug Delivery Strategies for Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs

How to Cite

Lehto, V.-P., Salonen, J., Santos, H. and Riikonen, J. (2013) Nanostructured Silicon-Based Materials as a Drug Delivery System for Water-Insoluble Drugs, in Drug Delivery Strategies for Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs (eds D. Douroumis and A. Fahr), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118444726.ch15

Editor Information

  1. 1

    School of Science, University of Greenwich, UK

  2. 2

    Friedrich-Schiller University of Jena, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 FEB 2013
  2. Published Print: 21 JAN 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470711972

Online ISBN: 9781118444726

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Keywords:

  • micelles;
  • micellization;
  • critical micelles concentrations;
  • amphiphilic;
  • copolymer;
  • polymeric;
  • drug delivery;
  • hydrophobic;
  • targeting;
  • multifunctional

Summary

The utilization of mesoporous inorganic materials to improve the dissolution of poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients in oral drug delivery has dramatically increased during the past 10 years. The focus of the present chapter is porous silicon (elemental Si) but the consideration is partly valid also for silicon oxide-based mesoporous materials. Basically, the principle to improve the dissolution behaviour of the payload drugs is the same for both materials: by confining the drug in a space only few times larger than the drug molecules themselves, the physicochemical properties of the drug can be dramatically changed. The confinement leads to stabilized disordered structure (amorphous or nanocrystalline) of the drug with improved dissolution properties. The characteristics of the drug carrier system can be tuned with the physical and chemical properties of the carrier which makes these materials versatile drug carriers. Furthermore, the material can be designed to be suitable for practically any type of payload molecules without compromising the high payload capacity and the stability of the molecules.