7. Development of Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems (SEDDS) for Oral Bioavailability Enhancement of Poorly Soluble Drugs

  1. Dennis Douroumis1 and
  2. Alfred Fahr2
  1. Dimitrios G. Fatouros and
  2. Anette Müllertz

Published Online: 4 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118444726.ch7

Drug Delivery Strategies for Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs

Drug Delivery Strategies for Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs

How to Cite

Fatouros, D. G. and Müllertz, A. (2013) Development of Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems (SEDDS) for Oral Bioavailability Enhancement of Poorly Soluble Drugs, in Drug Delivery Strategies for Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs (eds D. Douroumis and A. Fahr), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118444726.ch7

Editor Information

  1. 1

    School of Science, University of Greenwich, UK

  2. 2

    Friedrich-Schiller University of Jena, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 FEB 2013
  2. Published Print: 21 JAN 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470711972

Online ISBN: 9781118444726

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Keywords:

  • In vitro digestion model;
  • Lipolysis;
  • Self-emulsifying drug delivery systems;
  • SEDDS;
  • SMEDDS;
  • Oral absorption

Summary

In this chapter we place into context the mechanisms guide the lipid processing and drug solubilisation in the gastrointestinal tract. We review the evolution of the scientific progress that underpins current research efforts towards the design of novel self- emulsifying drug delivery systems that will provide the means of facilitating the transport poorly soluble drugs, which in turn will increase their oral bioavailability. Finally we review the use of τhe dynamic lipolysis model as a readily accessible in vitro means of determining the behaviour of poorly soluble compounds under conditions simulating those of the GIT under fasted or fed conditions. This model uses bile salts, phospholipids and the generation of lipolysis products (LP) to reproduce the solubilising environment of the GIT.