14. Nutrition and Human Health Benefits of Dry Beans and Pulses

  1. Muhammad Siddiq and
  2. Mark A. Uebersax
  1. Elizabeth A. Rondini1,
  2. Kathleen G. Barrett2 and
  3. Maurice R. Bennink1

Published Online: 10 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118448298.ch14

Dry Beans and Pulses Production, Processing and Nutrition

Dry Beans and Pulses Production, Processing and Nutrition

How to Cite

Rondini, E. A., Barrett, K. G. and Bennink, M. R. (2012) Nutrition and Human Health Benefits of Dry Beans and Pulses, in Dry Beans and Pulses Production, Processing and Nutrition (eds M. Siddiq and M. A. Uebersax), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118448298.ch14

Editor Information

  1. Department of Food Science & Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA

  2. 2

    Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 10 OCT 2012
  2. Published Print: 5 NOV 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780813823874

Online ISBN: 9781118448298

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Keywords:

  • dry beans;
  • chronic disease;
  • glycemic index;
  • obesity;
  • diabetes;
  • cardiovascular disease;
  • longevity;
  • colorectal cancer;
  • breast cancer;
  • prostate cancer

Summary

Beans and pulses are good sources of protein, carbohydrates, dietary fiber, vitamins, and minerals as well as being low in sodium. Their high content of soluble dietary fiber which can help to lower blood cholesterol, a main risk factor in cardiovascular disease, makes them promising as healthy foods. Chronic diseases including heart disease, stroke, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes, are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Dietary guidelines to prevent and/or manage chronic diseases are made independently by professional and/or governmental agencies at national, regional, and international levels. Almost all agencies emphasize the importance of consuming legumes (peas, beans, and lentils) to promote optimal health and reduce chronic disease risk. Dry beans are an economical source of concentrated vegetable protein and are also an excellent source of dietary fiber (both soluble and insoluble) as well as several vitamins and minerals.