109. Development and Structure of Teeth and Periodontal Tissues

  1. Clifford J. Rosen MD
  1. Petros Papagerakis and
  2. Thimios Mitsiadis

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118453926.ch109

Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition

Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition

How to Cite

Papagerakis, P. and Mitsiadis, T. (2013) Development and Structure of Teeth and Periodontal Tissues, in Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition (ed C. J. Rosen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Ames, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118453926.ch109

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118453889

Online ISBN: 9781118453926

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Keywords:

  • dental cell differentiation;
  • dental mineralized tissues;
  • periodontal tissues;
  • stem cells;
  • tooth development;
  • tooth morphogenesis;
  • tooth repair

Summary

Tooth development or odontogenesis is the complex process by which dental mineralized tissues form from embryonic cells that differentiate into ameloblasts that secrete enamel, odontoblasts that produce dentin, and cementoblasts that make cementum. Tooth development proceeds through a series of morphological stages that necessitate sequential and reciprocal interactions between the oral epithelium and the underlying cranial neural crest-derived mesenchyme. Signaling molecules control all steps of tooth formation by coordinating cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, extracellular matrix synthesis, and mineral deposition. Dental cell differentiation results in the formation of the three dental mineralized tissues (enamel, dentin, cementum) which are connected through the periodontal ligament (PDL) to the alveolar bone. The alveolar bone is a part of the periodontal tissues, functioning as an anchorage of the tooth root to the alveoli and resorbing the forces generated by the function of mastication. Stem cells play a critical role in tissue homeostasis and repair.