119. Obesity and Skeletal Mass

  1. Clifford J. Rosen MD
  1. Sue Shapses and
  2. Deeptha Sukumar

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118453926.ch119

Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition

Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition

How to Cite

Shapses, S. and Sukumar, D. (2013) Obesity and Skeletal Mass, in Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition (ed C. J. Rosen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Ames, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118453926.ch119

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118453889

Online ISBN: 9781118453926

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Keywords:

  • adipokines;
  • bone marrow fat;
  • bone mineral density (BMD);
  • fracture risk;
  • obesity;
  • skeletal mass;
  • weight reduction

Summary

Obesity is a national health problem and its prevalence is increasing in developing countries. Obesity may induce changes in bone due to several mechanisms, including an altered hormonal milieu because of factors secreted by adipose tissue, known as adipokines, which may be important mediators in the bone-fat relationship. Many obese persons have a history of dieting, which may increase fracture risk. Also, adiposity-induced metabolic alterations, poor dietary intake, sarcopenia, and/or biomechanical disadvantages in obesity may contribute to the risk of fracture in obese children and adults. The benefits of weight reduction in the obese are multiple, and importantly, a higher protein intake, a multivitamin/mineral supplementation, and exercise should be encouraged to increase calcium and other micronutrients that are reduced during dieting to minimize bone loss.