35. Biochemical Markers of Bone Turnover in Osteoporosis

  1. Clifford J. Rosen MD
  1. Pawel Szulc,
  2. Douglas C. Bauer and
  3. Richard Eastell

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118453926.ch35

Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition

Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition

How to Cite

Szulc, P., Bauer, D. C. and Eastell, R. (2013) Biochemical Markers of Bone Turnover in Osteoporosis, in Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition (ed C. J. Rosen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Ames, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118453926.ch35

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118453889

Online ISBN: 9781118453926

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Keywords:

  • analytical variability;
  • bone formation;
  • bone resorption;
  • bone turnover markers (BTMs);
  • osteoporosis;
  • preanalytical variability

Summary

Bone turnover is characterized by two opposite activities: bone formation and bone resorption. There are two groups of biochemical bone turnover markers (BTMs), markers of bone formation and markers of bone resorption. The analytical variability of bone turnover depends on the BTM, the measurement method, and the technician's expertise. Several methods for measurements of BTMs are available (radioimmunoassay, immunoradiometric assay, enzymatic immunoassay, chemiluminescence). BTMs reflect the metabolic effect of drugs on bone turnover, help to establish the adequate dose, predict treatment-related increases in bone mineral density (BMD) and treatment related reduction in fracture risk. Thus, BTMs have the potential to be helpful in the clinical management of osteoporosis. Men with high bone turnover have lower BMD as well as poor cortical microarchitecture. BTMs may help to identify postmenopausal women at high risk of fracture and may improve persistence with antiresorptive treatment.