57. Juvenile Osteoporosis

  1. Clifford J. Rosen MD
  1. Nick Bishop and
  2. Francis H. Glorieux

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118453926.ch57

Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition

Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition

How to Cite

Bishop, N. and Glorieux, F. H. (2013) Juvenile Osteoporosis, in Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition (ed C. J. Rosen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Ames, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118453926.ch57

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118453889

Online ISBN: 9781118453926

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Keywords:

  • bone fragility;
  • idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis (IJO);
  • osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)

Summary

In the scientific literature and in clinical practice, the term “juvenile osteoporosis” is usually used to refer to idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis (IJO). This chapter discusses IJO as a primary disease. Osteoporosis in childhood and adolescence may result from mutations in genes principally affecting the amount and quality of the fibrous component of bone, presenting clinically as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), or secondary to a spectrum of diverse conditions, such as prolonged immobilization. The chapter presents a list of conditions that may be associated with bone fragility in children and adolescents. The effect of any kind of medical intervention is difficult to judge in IJO, because the disease is rare, has a variable course, and is said to resolve without treatment. Preventing deformities such as cardiorespiratory abnormalities and confinement to wheelchairs, with attendant loss of function should be the focus of attention during the active phase of the disease.