8. Animal Models: Genetic Manipulation

  1. Clifford J. Rosen MD
  1. Karen M. Lyons

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118453926.ch8

Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition

Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition

How to Cite

M. Lyons, K. (2013) Animal Models: Genetic Manipulation, in Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition (ed C. J. Rosen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Ames, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118453926.ch8

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118453889

Online ISBN: 9781118453926

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Keywords:

  • animal models;
  • gene targeting;
  • genetic manipulation;
  • tissue-specific gene knockout

Summary

Genetically manipulated mice have contributed enormously to our identification of genes controlling skeletal development and to the clarification of their mechanisms of action. The ability to introduce defined mutations has facilitated the production of animal models of human diseases, cell lineage studies, examination of tissue-specific functions, and dissection of distinct gene functions at specific stages of differentiation within a single cell lineage. The first widely used approach to study gene function in vivo was to produce transgenic mice that overexpress target genes. The most widely used technique for genetic manipulation is gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The ability to achieve site-specific recombination has revolutionized analysis of gene action in skeletal cells. Tissue-specific recombination circumvents the early lethality associated with global knockout or overexpression.