97. Tumoral Calcinosis–Dermatomyositis

  1. Clifford J. Rosen MD
  1. Nicholas Shaw

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118453926.ch97

Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition

Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition

How to Cite

Shaw, N. (2013) Tumoral Calcinosis–Dermatomyositis, in Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism, Eighth Edition (ed C. J. Rosen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Ames, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118453926.ch97

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118453889

Online ISBN: 9781118453926

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Keywords:

  • bone;
  • dermatomyositis;
  • tumoral calcinosis

Summary

This chapter discusses the clinical features, radiographic findings, biochemical features, and treatment of tumoral calcinosis and dermatomyositis. Tumoral calcinosis is a rare metabolic disorder characterized by the progressive deposition of calcium phosphate crystals in periarticular spaces and soft tissues. An isotope bone scan is the most reliable and simplest method for detection, localization, and assessment of extension of the calcific masses. The tubular maximum of tubular phosphate reabsorption in relation to the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is elevated, but renal function is otherwise normal. The identification of the role of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) in phosphate metabolism and tumoral calcinosis may lead to new medical approaches to treatment. Juvenile dermatomyositis is an idiopathic inflammatory disorder of the skin and muscle. High-dose corticosteroids soon after the onset of symptoms remain the mainstay of current treatment, reducing the potential risk of calcinosis by suppression of the inflammatory process.