12. Improving the Safety of Imported Foods With Intelligent Systems

The Case of United States–Mexico Fresh Produce Supply Chain

  1. Wayne Ellefson1,
  2. Lorna Zach2,3 and
  3. Darryl Sullivan3
  1. William Nganje1,
  2. Na Hu2,
  3. Timothy Richards3 and
  4. Albert Kagan4

Published Online: 23 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118464298.ch12

Improving Import Food Safety

Improving Import Food Safety

How to Cite

Nganje, W., Hu, N., Richards, T. and Kagan, A. (2012) Improving the Safety of Imported Foods With Intelligent Systems, in Improving Import Food Safety (eds W. Ellefson, L. Zach and D. Sullivan), John Wiley & Sons, Inc, Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118464298.ch12

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Covance Laboratories, Inc. Madison, WI, USA

  2. 2

    Center for Human Performance and Risk Analysis University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI, USA

  3. 3

    USA and System Solutions for the Food Industry Mt Horeb, WI, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Covance Laboratories, Inc. Madison, WI, USA

  2. 2

    Center for Human Performance and Risk Analysis University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI, USA

  3. 3

    USA and System Solutions for the Food Industry Mt Horeb, WI, USA

  4. 4

    Covance Laboratories, Inc. Madison, WI, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 OCT 2012
  2. Published Print: 31 DEC 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780813808772

Online ISBN: 9781118464298

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Keywords:

  • intelligent systems;
  • food safety;
  • agro-terrorism;
  • imported produce;
  • inspection

Summary

Demand for Mexico-grown fruits and vegetables in the United States is increasing substantially because of limited off-season domestic production. Imported foods have been associated with significant food safety risks and concerns about agro-terrorism or defense risks in recent years. While import inspections should help protect against outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, it is neither possible nor optimal to inspect all produce at the port of entry. We use a threat, vulnerability, and consequence prevention model to evaluate the effectiveness of current import inspection practices and derive implications for intelligent food safety/defense systems. Intelligent systems could alleviate issues related to information sharing, cost-effective use of limited resources, and help mitigate potential market failure problems related to food import safety.