24. In Search of Strategies to Mitigate the Impacts of Global Warming on Aquatic Ecosystems

  1. Charles R. Goldman3,
  2. Michio Kumagai4 and
  3. Richard D. Robarts5
  1. Justin D. Brookes1,
  2. Martin Schmid2,
  3. Dominic Skinner1 and
  4. Alfred Wüest2

Published Online: 20 NOV 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118470596.ch24

Climatic Change and Global Warming of Inland Waters: Impacts and Mitigation for Ecosystems and Societies

Climatic Change and Global Warming of Inland Waters: Impacts and Mitigation for Ecosystems and Societies

How to Cite

Brookes, J. D., Schmid, M., Skinner, D. and Wüest, A. (2012) In Search of Strategies to Mitigate the Impacts of Global Warming on Aquatic Ecosystems, in Climatic Change and Global Warming of Inland Waters: Impacts and Mitigation for Ecosystems and Societies (eds C. R. Goldman, M. Kumagai and R. D. Robarts), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118470596.ch24

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis, USA

  2. 4

    Lake Biwa Sigma Research Center, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Japan

  3. 5

    World Water and Climate Network, Saskatoon, Canada

Author Information

  1. 1

    School of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Adelaide, Australia

  2. 2

    Eawag, Surface Waters—Research and Management, Kastanienbaum, Switzerland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 NOV 2012
  2. Published Print: 14 DEC 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119968665

Online ISBN: 9781118470596

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Keywords:

  • global warming of aquatic ecosystems;
  • global warming and impact;
  • hydrology, altering lake nutrients;
  • hydropower and cooling potential;
  • warming of aquatic habitats;
  • shading using riparian, bank stability;
  • natural/engineering, impact mitigation

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Global warming and impacts on aquatic ecosystems

  • First level—potential for reducing temperature in aquatic habitats

  • Second level—opportunities to modify heat distribution

  • Third level—opportunities for lakes to reduce greenhouse gases

  • Conclusions

  • Acknowledgements

  • References