12. Seasonal Virus Infections: Prevention and Management Guidelines

  1. Bipin N Savani MD
  1. Gaurav Trikha1 and
  2. John R Wingard2

Published Online: 6 SEP 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118473306.ch12

Blood and Marrow Transplantation Long-Term Management: Prevention and Complications

Blood and Marrow Transplantation Long-Term Management: Prevention and Complications

How to Cite

Trikha, G. and Wingard, J. R. (2013) Seasonal Virus Infections: Prevention and Management Guidelines, in Blood and Marrow Transplantation Long-Term Management: Prevention and Complications (ed B. N. Savani), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118473306.ch12

Editor Information

  1. Professor of Medicine,Director, Long Term Transplant Clinic, Hematology and Stem Cell Transplantation Section, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Shands Hospital at University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

  2. 2

    Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 SEP 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 OCT 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118473405

Online ISBN: 9781118473306

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Keywords:

  • respiratory viral infections;
  • stem cell transplant;
  • diagnostic;
  • treatment;
  • prevention;
  • investigational

Summary

Seasonal community respiratory viral (CRV) infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients cause significant morbidity and mortality. This chapter focuses on the common CRV infections in HCT patients with emphasis on diagnostic strategies, current antiviral treatment recommendations, and prevention of infections in HCT patients; novel investigational therapeutic approaches currently being tested in the clinic are also discussed. In addition to the morbidity and mortality caused by these viruses, the development of multidrug resistance leading to transmission of resistant viruses is of great public health concern. The development of effective new therapies for CRV infections in these high-risk patients is needed with randomized placebo-controlled studies to assess their clinical utility.