16. Ocular Complications: Prevalence, Monitoring, Prevention, and Management Guidelines

  1. Bipin N Savani MD
  1. André Tichelli and
  2. Alicia Rovó

Published Online: 6 SEP 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118473306.ch16

Blood and Marrow Transplantation Long-Term Management: Prevention and Complications

Blood and Marrow Transplantation Long-Term Management: Prevention and Complications

How to Cite

Tichelli, A. and Rovó, A. (2013) Ocular Complications: Prevalence, Monitoring, Prevention, and Management Guidelines, in Blood and Marrow Transplantation Long-Term Management: Prevention and Complications (ed B. N. Savani), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118473306.ch16

Editor Information

  1. Professor of Medicine,Director, Long Term Transplant Clinic, Hematology and Stem Cell Transplantation Section, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA

Author Information

  1. Hematology Division, Basel University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 SEP 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 OCT 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118473405

Online ISBN: 9781118473306

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Keywords:

  • hematopoietic stem cell transplantation;
  • late effects;
  • ocular complications;
  • cataract;
  • dry eye syndrome;
  • ocular GVHD;
  • ischemic retinopathy

Summary

Ocular complications of the anterior segment are frequent late effects after HSCT. They include cataract formation and dry eye syndrome. Both complications contribute significantly to the increased risk of chronic health condition after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, resulting in visual impairment. However, cataract and dry eye syndrome differ in respect of risk factors, screening, and preventive and treatment practices. Cataract is closely related to total body radiation used for conditioning and to a lesser extent with the use of corticosteroids, and dry eye syndrome with the occurrence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. In contrast, long-term complications of the posterior chamber are less frequent, including retinal microvascular changes, optic disk edema, hemorrhagic complications, and infectious retinitis. Ischemic retinopathy with cotton-wool spots and optic-disk edema are related to total body irradiation and the use of cyclosporine. Mostly they resolve with withdrawal or reduction of immunosuppressive drugs.