20. Follow-Up of Children after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: growth and Development

  1. Bipin N Savani MD
  1. Kristina K Hardy1,
  2. David A Jacobsohn2 and
  3. Evelio Perez-Albuerne2

Published Online: 6 SEP 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118473306.ch20

Blood and Marrow Transplantation Long-Term Management: Prevention and Complications

Blood and Marrow Transplantation Long-Term Management: Prevention and Complications

How to Cite

Hardy, K. K., Jacobsohn, D. A. and Perez-Albuerne, E. (2013) Follow-Up of Children after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: growth and Development, in Blood and Marrow Transplantation Long-Term Management: Prevention and Complications (ed B. N. Savani), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118473306.ch20

Editor Information

  1. Professor of Medicine,Director, Long Term Transplant Clinic, Hematology and Stem Cell Transplantation Section, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Science, George Washington University, Neuropsychology Division, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA

  2. 2

    Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Children's National Medical Center, Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Washington, DC, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 SEP 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 OCT 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118473405

Online ISBN: 9781118473306

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Keywords:

  • hematopoietic stem cell transplantation;
  • children;
  • late effects;
  • growth;
  • neurocognitive

Summary

This chapter focuses on growth and cognitive issues of children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The chapter is split into two sections: one on growth and one on neurocognitive development. Following linear growth, weight and body mass index in children after HSCT is very important. Many pediatric HSCT patients will have poor linear growth and some will benefit from growth hormone (GH) therapy if they are GH-deficient, which is not uncommon. In terms of neurocognitive sequelae, global intellectual functioning is preserved for many patients. Some exceptions are infants receiving HSCT and/or children that received cranial radiation prior to HSCT.