10. Better Late than Never

  1. James C. Pile3,
  2. Thomas E. Baudendistel4 and
  3. Brian J. Harte5
  1. Anuradha Ramaswamy1,
  2. Maytee Boonyapredee2,
  3. Ramakrishnan Ranganath2,
  4. Brian J. Harte5 and
  5. James C. Pile3

Published Online: 21 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118483206.ch10

Clinical Care Conundrums: Challenging Diagnoses in Hospital Medicine

Clinical Care Conundrums: Challenging Diagnoses in Hospital Medicine

How to Cite

Ramaswamy, A., Boonyapredee, M., Ranganath, R., Harte, B. J. and Pile, J. C. (2013) Better Late than Never, in Clinical Care Conundrums: Challenging Diagnoses in Hospital Medicine (eds J. C. Pile, T. E. Baudendistel and B. J. Harte), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118483206.ch10

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Departments of Hospital Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

  2. 4

    Department of Medicine, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Oakland, California, USA

  3. 5

    South Pointe Hospital, Cleveland Clinic Health System, Warrensville Heights, Ohio, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Internal Medicine, Franklin Square Hospital Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Hospital Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

  4. 5

    South Pointe Hospital, Cleveland Clinic Health System, Warrensville Heights, Ohio, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 15 MAR 2013

Book Series:

  1. Hospital Medicine: Current Concepts

Book Series Editors:

  1. Scott A. Flanders and
  2. Sanjay Saint

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470905654

Online ISBN: 9781118483206

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • autoinfection;
  • corticosteroids;
  • gastrointestinal phenomena;
  • hyperinfection;
  • intestinal obstruction;
  • pulmonary symptoms;
  • strongyloidiasis;
  • worms

Summary

Chronic strongyloidiasis is common in the developing world (particularly, Southeast Asia) and places infected individuals at significant risk of life-threatening hyperinfection if not recognized and treated prior to the initiation of immunosuppressive medication, especially corticosteroids. Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome may be protean in its manifestations, and hypereosinophilia is often absent, but gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and cutaneous signs and symptoms are most common. Diagnosis of strongyloidiasis is most often confirmed serologically, whereas the hyperinfection syndrome can be diagnosed reliably with stool studies.