The Occurrence of Glaucony in the Stratigraphic Record: Distribution Patterns and Sequence-Stratigraphic Significance

  1. Sadoon Morad,
  2. J. Marcelo Ketzer and
  3. Luiz F. De Ros
  1. Alessandro Amorosi

Published Online: 22 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118485347.ch2

Linking Diagenesis to Sequence Stratigraphy

Linking Diagenesis to Sequence Stratigraphy

How to Cite

Amorosi, A. (2013) The Occurrence of Glaucony in the Stratigraphic Record: Distribution Patterns and Sequence-Stratigraphic Significance, in Linking Diagenesis to Sequence Stratigraphy (eds S. Morad, J. M. Ketzer and L. F. De Ros), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., West Sussex, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118485347.ch2

Author Information

  1. University of Bologna, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Geologico-Ambientali, Via Zamboni 67, 40127 Bologna, Italy (E-mail: alessandro.amorosi@unibo.it)

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 22 MAY 2013
  2. Published Print: 11 JAN 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118485392

Online ISBN: 9781118485347

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Keywords:

  • condensed sections;
  • glaucony;
  • mega-condensed sections;
  • sequence stratigraphy;
  • simple omission surfaces;
  • spatial distribution

Summary

Glaucony is traditionally regarded as an indicator of low sedimentation rates and represents one of the most reliable stratigraphic markers within marine sediments. This chapter presents the state-of-the-art on the sequence-stratigraphic significance of glaucony, with a review of fifteen years of studies following the model developed by Amorosi (1995). It offers new insights into the variety of stratigraphically condensed, glaucony-bearing deposits, through their subdivision into three basic types (simple omission surfaces, condensed sections and mega-condensed sections), with distinctive glaucony characteristics. The study is based on careful examination of about 250 glauconitic horizons cropping out in 41 different sections in Western Europe. This large database is representative of a wide variety of depositional settings and a large spectrum of ages (from Cretaceous to Pliocene).