Sequence Architecture and Palaeoclimate Controls on Diagenesis Related to Subaerial Exposure of Icehouse Cyclic Pennsylvanian and Permian Carbonates

  1. Sadoon Morad,
  2. J. Marcelo Ketzer and
  3. Luiz F. De Ros
  1. GOvert J.A. Buijs1 and
  2. Robert H. Goldstein2

Published Online: 22 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118485347.ch3

Linking Diagenesis to Sequence Stratigraphy

Linking Diagenesis to Sequence Stratigraphy

How to Cite

Buijs, G. J.A. and Goldstein, R. H. (2013) Sequence Architecture and Palaeoclimate Controls on Diagenesis Related to Subaerial Exposure of Icehouse Cyclic Pennsylvanian and Permian Carbonates, in Linking Diagenesis to Sequence Stratigraphy (eds S. Morad, J. M. Ketzer and L. F. De Ros), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., West Sussex, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118485347.ch3

Author Information

  1. 1

    Present Address: Mærsk Olie Og Gas AS, Esplanaden 50, 1263 Copenhagen K, Denmark.

  2. 2

    Department of Geology, University of Kansas, 1475 Jayhawk Blvd. 120 Lindley Hall, Lawrence, Kansas 66045, USA; E-mail: govert.buijs@maerskoil.com, gold@ku.edu

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 22 MAY 2013
  2. Published Print: 11 JAN 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118485392

Online ISBN: 9781118485347

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Keywords:

  • calcite cement;
  • diagenesis;
  • icehouse sequences;
  • palaeoclimate;
  • Pennsylvanian carbonate reservoirs;
  • Permian carbonate reservoirs;
  • sequence architecture;
  • subaerial exposure

Summary

Subaerial exposure of icehouse sequences from the Pennsylvanian and Permian of the Hugoton embayment in western Kansas resulted in predictable patterns of carbonate diagenesis with fabric-selective dissolution and fine, blocky calcite cement and overgrowths. The observations show how sequence stratigraphy and shelf setting can be used to predict porosity in carbonate reservoirs. The amount of early calcite cement is controlled by sequence architecture and, to a lesser extent, by climate during subaerial exposure. The relative importance of mixing-zone cementation can be best explained by the setting of the RB core, where the low slope and interstratified siliciclastic aquitards decreased recharge and flow of meteoric groundwater, leading to little flux of meteoric water and little meteoric calcite cement. Understanding the effects of sequence architecture and palaeoclimate on the distribution of diagenetic fabrics can help in the exploitation of Pennsylvanian and Permian carbonate reservoirs as well as other carbonate reservoir targets worldwide.