12. Monitoring and Evaluating the Socioeconomic Impacts of Conservation Projects on Local Communities

  1. Ben Collen2,
  2. Nathalie Pettorelli2,
  3. Jonathan E. M. Baillie3 and
  4. Sarah M. Durant2
  1. Katherine Homewood

Published Online: 25 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118490747.ch12

Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action

Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action

How to Cite

Homewood, K. (2013) Monitoring and Evaluating the Socioeconomic Impacts of Conservation Projects on Local Communities, in Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action (eds B. Collen, N. Pettorelli, J. E. M. Baillie and S. M. Durant), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118490747.ch12

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

  2. 3

    Conservation Programmes, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

Author Information

  1. University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 FEB 2013
  2. Published Print: 12 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444332919

Online ISBN: 9781118490747

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Keywords:

  • biodiversity conservation projects;
  • local communities;
  • socioeconomic monitoring

Summary

This chapter discusses monitoring and evaluating the socioeconomic impacts of biodiversity conservation projects on local communities. It focuses on three specific questions central to socioeconomic monitoring for conservation initiatives. These are: why monitor the socioeconomic impacts of conservation projects?, what are the main dimensions to be monitored?, and what methods are available, and what are the main pitfalls in monitoring social and economic impacts?. The reason to monitor the social and economic impacts of conservation initiatives are pragmatic, legal, and ethical accountability. Experience shows that in designing social impact assessment it is necessary to consider external factors and the wider context, scale at which impacts may be felt, and balancing ‘expert’ analysis with local knowledge.