14. Building Sustainable National Monitoring Networks

  1. Ben Collen1,
  2. Nathalie Pettorelli1,
  3. Jonathan E. M. Baillie2 and
  4. Sarah M. Durant1
  1. Sarah M. Durant

Published Online: 25 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118490747.ch14

Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action

Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action

How to Cite

Durant, S. M. (2013) Building Sustainable National Monitoring Networks, in Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action (eds B. Collen, N. Pettorelli, J. E. M. Baillie and S. M. Durant), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118490747.ch14

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

  2. 2

    Conservation Programmes, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

Author Information

  1. Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 FEB 2013
  2. Published Print: 12 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444332919

Online ISBN: 9781118490747

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Keywords:

  • biodiversity conservation;
  • biodiversity monitoring program;
  • data analysis;
  • international conventions;
  • sustainable national monitoring networks

Summary

Biodiversity monitoring is a necessary part of conservation management and is key to management plans of protected areas and ecosystems. This chapter addresses in detail all the aspects of biodiversity monitoring that need to be considered if data are to be used for maximum effect. It argues for embedding biodiversity monitoring within a national context, to ensure that it is aligned with local and national priorities and engages managers and policy-makers from the beginning. It first outlines reporting obligations incurred by international conventions, and then discusses a national approach to monitoring. Then, it explores the different stages that should be considered in the development and implementation of an effective monitoring plan, grounded in good science, but focused on clear conservation goals. Finally, the chapter places this approach in the context of developing the institutional networks and capacity necessary to ensure that information from monitoring is put to effective use.