15. Monitoring in the Real World

  1. Ben Collen2,
  2. Nathalie Pettorelli2,
  3. Jonathan E. M. Baillie3 and
  4. Sarah M. Durant2
  1. Julia P. G. Jones

Published Online: 25 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118490747.ch15

Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action

Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action

How to Cite

Jones, J. P. G. (2013) Monitoring in the Real World, in Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action (eds B. Collen, N. Pettorelli, J. E. M. Baillie and S. M. Durant), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118490747.ch15

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

  2. 3

    Conservation Programmes, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

Author Information

  1. Julia Jones School of the Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor University, Bangor, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 FEB 2013
  2. Published Print: 12 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444332919

Online ISBN: 9781118490747

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • biodiversity conservation monitoring;
  • ecology

Summary

This chapter focuses on biodiversity conversion monitoring in the real world. It emphasizes that the real world is one constrained by limited resources and that this must influence how we think about conservation monitoring. The chapter focuses on conversion monitoring programmes aiming to monitor ecological trends (such as species abundance, distribution, habitat extent, or quality). It starts by considering the importance of doing monitoring powerful enough to be informative, and then introduces some specific challenges to monitoring in the real world. The chapter ends with a discussion on what would make an ideal real-world monitoring scheme.