3. The Wildlife Picture Index: A Biodiversity Indicator for Top Trophic Levels

  1. Ben Collen3,
  2. Nathalie Pettorelli3,
  3. Jonathan E. M. Baillie4 and
  4. Sarah M. Durant3
  1. Timothy G. O'Brien1 and
  2. Margaret F. Kinnaird2

Published Online: 25 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118490747.ch3

Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action

Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action

How to Cite

O'Brien, T. G. and Kinnaird, M. F. (2013) The Wildlife Picture Index: A Biodiversity Indicator for Top Trophic Levels, in Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action (eds B. Collen, N. Pettorelli, J. E. M. Baillie and S. M. Durant), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118490747.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

  2. 4

    Conservation Programmes, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Wildlife Conservation Society, Global Conservation Programs, 2300 Southern Blvd., Bronx, New York 10460, USA

  2. 2

    Mpala Research Centre, PO Box 555, Nanyuki, Kenya 10400

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 FEB 2013
  2. Published Print: 12 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444332919

Online ISBN: 9781118490747

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Keywords:

  • biodiversity indicator;
  • camera trap surveys;
  • ecosystem;
  • mammals;
  • preliminary bootstrapping analysis;
  • savanna birds;
  • trophic levels;
  • wildlife picture index (WPI)

Summary

This chapter talks about a biodiversity indicator for top trophic levels, the Wildlife Picture Index (WPI). The WPI targets communities of terrestrial forest and savanna birds and mammals that occupy top trophic levels in their ecosystems. To develop a WPI, the chapter begins with a camera trap survey designed to be (i) spatially representative of the area of interest, (ii) of sufficient sampling intensity to detect a representative sample of the species in the target community, and (iii) of sufficient duration to develop unbiased occupancy estimates for the sampled species. Then, it presents a preliminary bootstrapping analysis of the WPI to examine the precision and robustness of the index. The WPI is a cost-effective alternative to line transect surveys, and probably other labour-intensive surveys, producing more data and more representative data for less cost. Finally, the chapter talks about strengths and weaknesses of the WPI.