5. Satellite Data-Based Indices to Monitor Land Use and Habitat Changes

  1. Ben Collen1,
  2. Nathalie Pettorelli1,
  3. Jonathan E. M. Baillie2 and
  4. Sarah M. Durant1
  1. Nathalie Pettorelli

Published Online: 25 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118490747.ch5

Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action

Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action

How to Cite

Pettorelli, N. (2013) Satellite Data-Based Indices to Monitor Land Use and Habitat Changes, in Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action (eds B. Collen, N. Pettorelli, J. E. M. Baillie and S. M. Durant), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118490747.ch5

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

  2. 2

    Conservation Programmes, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

Author Information

  1. Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 FEB 2013
  2. Published Print: 12 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444332919

Online ISBN: 9781118490747

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Keywords:

  • biodiversity;
  • ecology;
  • environmental change;
  • habitat changes;
  • land use;
  • normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI);
  • satellites

Summary

This chapter first describes satellites and their possible role in helping monitoring biodiversity through habitat change. The chapter describes the type of information that can be accessed by sensors on board various satellites, such as land cover, land use, vegetation structure, and ground surface elevations. It focuses on one type of information derived from various sensors (radio detection and ranging (RADAR) and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems), and satellites (e.g. Landsat, AVHRR, MODIS, SeaWiFS, SPOT), namely the information encapsulated in vegetation indices. Vegetation indices are quantitative measures that attempt to measure vegetation biomass or vegetative vigour. The chapter then talks about satellite-derived vegetation indices, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), which has proven to be extremely useful to ecologists dealing with assessing ecological responses to environmental change.