9. Personalized Measures of Consumption and Development in the Context of Biodiversity Conservation: Connecting the Ecological Footprint Calculation with the Human Footprint Map

  1. Ben Collen2,
  2. Nathalie Pettorelli2,
  3. Jonathan E. M. Baillie3 and
  4. Sarah M. Durant2
  1. Eric W. Sanderson

Published Online: 25 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118490747.ch9

Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action

Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action

How to Cite

Sanderson, E. W. (2013) Personalized Measures of Consumption and Development in the Context of Biodiversity Conservation: Connecting the Ecological Footprint Calculation with the Human Footprint Map, in Biodiversity Monitoring and Conservation: Bridging the Gap between Global Commitment and Local Action (eds B. Collen, N. Pettorelli, J. E. M. Baillie and S. M. Durant), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118490747.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

  2. 3

    Conservation Programmes, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4RY, UK

Author Information

  1. Global Conservation Programs, Wildlife Conservation Society, 2300 Southern Blvd., Bronx, New York 10460, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 FEB 2013
  2. Published Print: 12 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444332919

Online ISBN: 9781118490747

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Keywords:

  • biodiversity conservation;
  • ecological footprint calculation;
  • human footprint map;
  • human impact

Summary

The most important component of biodiversity to monitor may be us, the human species. Two key measures of human impact on the biosphere are denoted metaphorically as footprints: the human footprint map and the ecological footprint calculation. Both the human footprint map and the ecological footprint calculation have had important impacts on conservation policy and public education efforts, but these two similar sounding conservation tools actually represent two quite different approaches to measuring development and consumption, starting from different premises and yielding different, but complementary, measures. This chapter provides a path of connection between the ecological footprint and the human footprint, which eventually could lead to a personalized, spatialized ecological human footprint. It also discusses an equivalency between the ecological footprint and the human footprint map at the national scale, matching up consumption to production, ecological footprint’s global hectare (gha) to the human footprint’s human influence index (HII).