1. Introduction

  1. Ingvar Eidhammer,
  2. Harald Barsnes,
  3. Geir Egil Eide and
  4. Lennart Martens

Published Online: 10 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118494042.ch1

Computational and Statistical Methods for Protein Quantification by Mass Spectrometry

Computational and Statistical Methods for Protein Quantification by Mass Spectrometry

How to Cite

Eidhammer, I., Barsnes, H., Eide, G. E. and Martens, L. (2013) Introduction, in Computational and Statistical Methods for Protein Quantification by Mass Spectrometry, John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118494042.ch1

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 10 JAN 2013
  2. Published Print: 4 JAN 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119964001

Online ISBN: 9781118494042

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Keywords:

  • homeostasis;
  • protein abundances;
  • protein quantification;
  • proteome profiles

Summary

An organism is a living object that can react to stimuli, grow, reproduce, and is capable of maintaining stability (homeostasis). Homeostasis, physiology, and pathology are frequently used terms when describing protein quantification experiments. Various molecular biology and medical experiments involve taking samples from a specific site from one or more research subjects. The subjects are most often of the same species, but cross-species experiments also occur. Protein quantification concerns the determination of the amount of protein, relative, or absolute in gram or mole, in a sample of interest. Protein abundances are commonly specified in profiles. The two types of profiles are: protein profiles and proteome profiles. Many experiments try to analyze how the profiles depend on changing the value of one or more features of the sites. The overall goals for proteomics experiments are impossible to achieve with just one type of experiment.

Controlled Vocabulary Terms

Computational statistics; Inferential statistics