6. Interpretation, Evaluation and Reporting of Results

  1. Adrian M. T. Linacre1 and
  2. Shanan S. Tobe2

Published Online: 7 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118496411.ch6

Wildlife DNA Analysis: Applications in Forensic Science

Wildlife DNA Analysis: Applications in Forensic Science

How to Cite

Linacre, A. M. T. and Tobe, S. S. (2013) Interpretation, Evaluation and Reporting of Results, in Wildlife DNA Analysis: Applications in Forensic Science, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118496411.ch6

Author Information

  1. 1

    Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia

  2. 2

    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 APR 2013
  2. Published Print: 10 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470665954

Online ISBN: 9781118496411

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Keywords:

  • DNA evidence evaluation;
  • expert witness;
  • interpretation;
  • report writing;
  • wildlife forensic science

Summary

Typically within the inquisitorial system there is one court-appointed expert who aids in the ‘finding of the truth’, whereas in the adversarial system the prosecution needs to prove the allegation, often with the assistance of an expert, and the defence may employ their own expert to either challenge the prosecution case or support an alternative hypothesis. This chapter introduces the concepts used in the evaluation of DNA evidence and guides the reader through the basic processes leading to reporting of the DNA evidence. There are currently three approaches to the evaluation of DNA evidence, namely, the frequentist approach, the likelihood approach, and the Bayesian approach. To illustrate some of the issues with DNA evidence used in wildlife cases a number of scenarios are provided in the chapter. These cases are fictitious although are based on real cases and research. They are used to comment on the issues raised.