1. Molecular Blueprint for Craniofacial Morphogenesis and Development

  1. George T.-J. Huang3 and
  2. Irma Thesleff4
  1. Paul A. Trainor

Published Online: 26 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118498026.ch1

Stem Cells in Craniofacial Development and Regeneration

Stem Cells in Craniofacial Development and Regeneration

How to Cite

Trainor, P. A. (2013) Molecular Blueprint for Craniofacial Morphogenesis and Development, in Stem Cells in Craniofacial Development and Regeneration (eds G. T.-J. Huang and I. Thesleff), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118498026.ch1

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Bioscience Research, College of Dentistry, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USA

  2. 4

    Developmental Biology Program, Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

Author Information

  1. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 22 MAR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118279236

Online ISBN: 9781118498026

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Keywords:

  • craniofacial morphogenesis;
  • ectoderm;
  • endoderm;
  • gastrulation;
  • mesoderm;
  • molecular blueprint;
  • triploblastic organism

Summary

In this chapter, specification of the major cell lineages, tissues, and structures that establish the molecular blueprint for craniofacial development is described, as well as the interactions and integration that are essential for normal functioning throughout embryonic as well as adult life are described. Craniofacial development begins during gastrulation, which is the process that generates a triploblastic organism. During gastrulation, cells from the epiblast are allocated to three definitive germ layers: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. Thus, gastrulation and generation of the three germ layers create the principal building blocks of the head and face. The ensuing morphogenetic movements that bring these tissue components to their proper place in the body plan establish the initial blueprint. Subsequent morphogenetic events continue to build on this scaffold until the fully differentiated structures emerge that define the head and face.