6. Tooth Morphogenesis and Renewal

  1. George T.-J. Huang1 and
  2. Irma Thesleff2
  1. Maria Jussila,
  2. Emma Juuri and
  3. Irma Thesleff

Published Online: 26 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118498026.ch6

Stem Cells in Craniofacial Development and Regeneration

Stem Cells in Craniofacial Development and Regeneration

How to Cite

Jussila, M., Juuri, E. and Thesleff, I. (2013) Tooth Morphogenesis and Renewal, in Stem Cells in Craniofacial Development and Regeneration (eds G. T.-J. Huang and I. Thesleff), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118498026.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Department of Bioscience Research, College of Dentistry, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USA

  2. 2

    Developmental Biology Program, Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

Author Information

  1. Developmental Biology Program, Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 22 MAR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118279236

Online ISBN: 9781118498026

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • dental epithelium;
  • mammalian replacement;
  • mesenchyme;
  • molecular regulation;
  • tooth morphogenesis

Summary

This chapter describes the developmental anatomy and molecular regulation of tooth initiation, morphogenesis, and cell differentiation, as well as of tooth renewal and replacement. Tooth morphogenesis is guided by interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal tissues and progresses through distinct stages defined by morphological features of the dental epithelium. Tooth morphogenesis is regulated by interactions between cells, in particular reciprocal and sequential interactions between the mesenchyme and epithelium. Tooth renewal and replacement require the action of stem cells that are capable of self-renewal and production of new progeny upon inductive signals. The study of tooth replacement using nonmodel animals for continuous lifelong tooth replacement, and the ferret for mammalian replacement, is generating new information on the mechanisms of successional tooth formation and the characteristics of dental stem and progenitor cells. For successful tooth regeneration, more detailed understanding is required of the gene regulatory networks and cellular mechanisms guiding tooth development.