17. Embryonic or Neural Stem Cells in Neurodegenerative Disease of the Central Nervous System (with Relevance to PD, HD, AD, MS, SCI, and Stroke)

  1. Ruth M. Warwick MB, ChB, FRCP, FRCPath3 and
  2. Scott A. Brubaker CTBS4
  1. Stephen B. Dunnett DSc, PhD, MA, BA(Hons), BSc(Hons), FMedSci, FLSW1,
  2. Cesar V. Borlongan PhD2 and
  3. Paul R. Sanberg PhD, DSc2

Published Online: 2 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118498453.ch17

Tissue and Cell Clinical Use: An Essential Guide

Tissue and Cell Clinical Use: An Essential Guide

How to Cite

Dunnett, S. B., Borlongan, C. V. and Sanberg, P. R. (2012) Embryonic or Neural Stem Cells in Neurodegenerative Disease of the Central Nervous System (with Relevance to PD, HD, AD, MS, SCI, and Stroke), in Tissue and Cell Clinical Use: An Essential Guide (eds R. M. Warwick and S. A. Brubaker), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118498453.ch17

Editor Information

  1. 3

    University of Bristol, Bristol, UK

  2. 4

    American Association of Tissue Banks, McLean, VA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK

  2. 2

    Department of Neurosurgery, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 2 AUG 2012
  2. Published Print: 7 SEP 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405198257

Online ISBN: 9781118498453

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Keywords:

  • neural transplantation;
  • Parkinson's disease;
  • Huntington's disease;
  • multiple sclerosis;
  • stroke;
  • spinal cord injury;
  • embryonic donors;
  • neural progenitor cells;
  • neural stem cells;
  • brain;
  • ES cells

Summary

There has been a recent dramatic increase in understanding how to replace neurons lost through aging, trauma or disease and how to repair brain damage with significant functional recovery in a variety of models of human neurodegenerative disease. Donor factors identified in various models indicate that underlying successful cell transplantation in the nervous system critically include cell harvesting at an appropriate stage notably in embryonic or neonatal development. Also necessary are an appropriate nutritive environment for cell growth and appropriate techniques of cell implantation. Animal and other models have demonstrated the potential feasibility of using cells for repair of central nervous system disorders but for the present time functional clinical use of such cells remains an innovation in development at least in part due to the complex and precisely organized anatomical structures involved. There are also donor supply and ethics issues and conflicting clinical trial work, however, clinicians are working to achieve consensus through the application of evidence-based medicine.