21. Transnational Civil Society and Social Movements

  1. Karin Gwinn Wilkins,
  2. Thomas Tufte and
  3. Rafael Obregon
  1. Anastasia Kavada

Published Online: 7 MAR 2014

DOI: 10.1002/9781118505328.ch21

The Handbook of Development Communication and Social Change

The Handbook of Development Communication and Social Change

How to Cite

Kavada, A. (2014) Transnational Civil Society and Social Movements, in The Handbook of Development Communication and Social Change (eds K. G. Wilkins, T. Tufte and R. Obregon), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118505328.ch21

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 MAR 2014
  2. Published Print: 4 APR 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118505311

Online ISBN: 9781118505328

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • global justice movement;
  • Internet;
  • non-governmental organizations (NGOs);
  • Occupy Movement;
  • social media;
  • social movements;
  • transnational advocacy networks (TANs);
  • transnational civil society

Summary

The emergence of the Internet has highlighted most powerfully the ways in which the media shape internal communication and the organizational forms of civil society. This chapter traces current changes in the organizational forms of global civil society and examines how these are related to new communication technologies. It defines the notion of global civil society focusing particularly on social movements and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Networks consist of diverse actors, which are connected with rich communication flows and ties of solidarity. They are fluid and flexible formations and easily adaptable to local conditions. The emergence of transnational advocacy networks (TANs) and the Global Justice Movement are considered as emblematic of this shift. Current movements such as Occupy exhibit similar characteristics that can be thought as an acceleration of previously observed patterns. These bring together “crowds of individuals” and are designed to accommodate personal narratives and individual voices.