10. Supply Chain Management and the Delivery of Ecosystems Services in Manufacturing

  1. Steve Wratten4,
  2. Harpinder Sandhu5,
  3. Ross Cullen6 and
  4. Robert Costanza7
  1. Mary Haropoulou1,
  2. Clive Smallman2 and
  3. Jack Radford3

Published Online: 20 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118506271.ch10

Ecosystem Services in Agricultural and Urban Landscapes

Ecosystem Services in Agricultural and Urban Landscapes

How to Cite

Haropoulou, M., Smallman, C. and Radford, J. (2013) Supply Chain Management and the Delivery of Ecosystems Services in Manufacturing, in Ecosystem Services in Agricultural and Urban Landscapes (eds S. Wratten, H. Sandhu, R. Cullen and R. Costanza), A John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118506271.ch10

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Bio-Protection Research Centre Lincoln University, New Zealand

  2. 5

    School of the Environment Flinders University, Australia

  3. 6

    Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance Lincoln University, New Zealand

  4. 7

    Crawford School of Public Policy Australian National University, Australia

Author Information

  1. 1

    Lincoln University, Canterbury, New Zealand and the University of Western Sydney, Australia

  2. 2

    University of Western Sydney, Australia

  3. 3

    Lincoln University, Canterbury, New Zealand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 JAN 2013
  2. Published Print: 25 MAR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405170086

Online ISBN: 9781118506271

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Keywords:

  • conventional economic production;
  • ecological economic systems;
  • ecosystems services;
  • supply chain management (SCM);
  • sustainable supply chains

Summary

This chapter reviews models of conventional and ecological economic systems and of varying conceptualizations of supply chain management. From this base, it offers a fresh synthesis of sustainable supply chain management and the concept of an ecological economic system. The authors evaluate the validity of this synthesis in describing and then discussing a qualitative case study of woollen carpet yarn manufacture, grounded in a life-cycle assessment of the production process and a 9-month field study of decision making in product creation, with a special interest in sustainable outcomes. The chapter also provides evidence to suggest that this conceptualization may offer a route to improving life cycle assessment as a means of analyzing the sustainability of a supply chain.