6. Detection of plant allergens in foods

  1. George Siragakis2 and
  2. Dimosthenis Kizis3
  1. Dimosthenis Kizis

Published Online: 27 DEC 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118519219.ch06

Food Allergen Testing: Molecular, Immunochemical and Chromatographic Techniques

Food Allergen Testing: Molecular, Immunochemical and Chromatographic Techniques

How to Cite

Kizis, D. (2014) Detection of plant allergens in foods, in Food Allergen Testing: Molecular, Immunochemical and Chromatographic Techniques (eds G. Siragakis and D. Kizis), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, United Kingdom. doi: 10.1002/9781118519219.ch06

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Food Allergens Laboratory, Athens, Greece

  2. 3

    Food Allergens Laboratory, Larnaca, Cyprus

Author Information

  1. Food Allergens Laboratory, Larnaca, Cyprus

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 DEC 2013
  2. Published Print: 3 FEB 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118519202

Online ISBN: 9781118519219

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Keywords:

  • ELISA;
  • foods;
  • PCR;
  • plant allergen detection

Summary

Plant allergens (allergenic proteins) are present in a wide range of foods. These foods are considered main allergenic foods with respect to the rate of allergenic incidents reported after food consumption, and in relation to the severity of the symptoms manifested to an individual. A wide range of assays for plant allergen detection in foods have been developed. ELISA and PCR are the most popular methods used so far. The effectiveness of any method to detect the specific allergen in a specific food depends on various parameters determined by the allergen itself, the food and the method's technical features. In general the analysis of a food matrix for detection of a food allergen is considered briefly as a two-step procedure comprising the step of analyte extraction and the step of detection–quantification of the specific allergen(s).